Selecting an Aerosol Can Disposal System

A wide variety of major industries utilize aerosol cans, spanning industrial manufacturing, municipalities and vocational education, among others. What happens to an aerosol can after it has reached its useful life?

Proper disposal guidelines dictate that pressurized aerosol cans are typically sealed in a drum to be processed as hazardous waste at a landfill or facility. The cans are considered to be hazardous because they contain a liquid hazardous waste or are still pressurized, which may cause them to potentially explode at the landfills. Companies that do not dispose of aerosol cans properly risk paying hefty fines.

Properly disposing of the cans, however, will save landfill space and reduce hazardous waste. Additionally, the processed cans may be sold as recyclable steel.

Selecting the correct Aerosol disposal system allows persons to stay clean and mess free while remaining fully compliant with OSHA and EPA standards.

Newstripe’s AeroVent Aerosol Disposal System helps you safely recycle your aerosol cans for recycling and assists environmentally-sensitive companies legally dispose of spent aerosol cans.

All our systems are easy-to-use. Mount the puncturing device onto any standard 30- or 55-gallon drum. Insert a can upside down and clamp into position. Activating the device penetrates the can with an angled pin. Remaining liquid contents pour out into the drum, along with the propellant and drains any remaining product along with the propellant into the sealed drum. A carbon filter absorbs any vapors and odors from the drum. Once full, dispose of it as hazardous liquid waste according to appropriate regulations.

The AeroVent Aerosol Can Disposal System is safe and the enclosed chamber protects the operator when puncturing and draining.

The system is easy to use along with being versatile and is EPA, RCRA, OSHA compliant.

By using an Aerosol Can Disposal System companies minimize the high expense of hazardous waste disposal utilizing the legal, easy way to turn empty aerosol cans into recyclable steel.

Aerosol Can Disposal issues

As noted earlier, leftover materials in partially filled cans may qualify as hazardous waste. If a can is found to be inoperative or malfunctioning, returning it to the supplier will prevent the user from having to treat it as hazardous waste.

Cans that are punctured and drained are not considered to be hazardous waste and may be recyclable. Companies that use a significant number of aerosol cans may wish to consider aerosol-puncturing equipment, which allows the contents of cans to be safely removed and prepared for disposal.

Aerosol cans are normally manufactured from thin sheets of steel. The products they hold are highly pressurized with a number of types of hydrocarbon propellants, from carbon dioxide or butane or propane. In recent years, some scientists and environmental activists have linked chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants to decreases in the planet’s ozone layer. Most manufacturers have shifted to propellants that are thought to be less damaging to the atmosphere

Aerosol cans should never be placed in fires or heated locations, because they may explode, and the propellant may be flammable. Cans that are still pressurized may also burst if place in a garbage compactor.

If cans that contain hazardous wastes are to be disposed, they should be placed in a special closed container displaying markings indicating that the waste is hazardous. The labeling should also indicate the specific types of waste and the date when the container began to be used. Keep records of when and how the waste was disposed or recycled.

Why are aerosol cans dangerous?

Aerosol cans are dangerous because of the unusual mix of substances stored under pressure inside the metal canister. Even if the active ingredient is not a hazardous chemical (eg, food products) the can is still capable of exploding or turning into a dangerous projectile. The biggest problem with aerosol cans in the workplace is their potential to ignite or explode other Dangerous Goods and Hazardous Substance.

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